Forum Search Archive Home
NESWORLD.COM - THE FAMICOM STUDYBOX
HARDWARE SECTION
OTHER
ADVERTISEMENT
SITE NAVIGATION
INTERACT
HOME
MESSAGEBOARD
E-MAIL WEBMASTER
VISITOR DETAILS
COUNTER STATS

VIEW STATISTICS

PAGE DETAILS
CREATION INFORMATION
CREATED AUG.09.2010
UPDATED NOV.21.2010
CREDITS
TEXT WRITTEN BY
MARTIN NIELSEN
THE FAMICOM STUDYBOX
LEARNING IS LIKE PLAYING A GAME
Way back in 1997 I received a few images of something called a Famicom Studybox found by someone I unfortunately have forgotten all about. The story gets even better now, cause I can't even remember how he obtained it or from where he got it. But as he had no tape for the system he had no way of testing it.

Well fast forward to March 2007, I discovered that a studybox was being auctioned off on ebay, priced $100. My curiosity talked my wallet into purchasing the device and about a week later it was sitting on a shelf in my gameroom collecting dust, and I was wondering why I had bought it.

So here we are a few years later and I've decided to dig up a little information about the Studybox.

It was released by Fukutake Publishing, now known as Benesse Corporation, a company that specializes in educational material for schools and such. The device sits on top of the Famicom unit and is pretty much a cassette tape player, meaning it reads the Famicom games off cassette tapes, kinda like the Commodore64.

The Studybox requires its own power source and the 10V adapter from my SegaCD worked flawlessly. As said, games are read off cassette tapes but the Studybox has no play, rewind or any other buttons for that matter. Once the device is powered with a tape inside, it will automaticly start reading the tape and present you with a chapter selection screen.

Once the chapter selection screen appears the Famicom controller is used to select chapter. The start button on the joypad then activates loading of the selected chapter.

As my japanese is extremely rusty I havn't been able to make much sense of the one tape I have available to me, but some sweet speech sequences are run and once chapter 3 is reached you, in this specific game, is given some answers to choose from, and that's where my studybox adventure ended.

All in all it's a pretty nice piece of Famicom history, but why Fukutake didn't just use the Famicom Disk System that was already available I don't know, maybe this thing was just easier for students to use and maybe the cassette tape would be able to hold more data?

Apparently there is more than one version of the Studybox, mine is the SBX-01 but it seems like there's also a Studybox 1000 for the Famicom.

SCREENSHOTS (DEVELOPMENT)